aeolus
AEOLUS
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Aeolus is a synthesised (i.e. not sampled) pipe organ emulator that should be good enough to make an organist enjoy playing it.
It is a software synthesiser optimised for this job, with possibly hundreds of controls for each stop, that enable the user to "voice" his instrument.
First presented at the 2nd LAD conference in Karlsruhe, end of April 2004.

Main features of the default instrument: three manuals and one pedal, five eleven different temperaments, variable tuning, MIDI control of course, stereo, surround or Ambisonics output, flexible audio controls including a large church reverb.

Aeolus is not very CPU-hungry, and should run without problems on a e.g. a 1GHz, 256Mb machine.

moinejf note: The version 0.9.0 was downloaded from http://kokkinizita.linuxaudio.org/linuxaudio/aeolus/index.html.

Aeolus 0.10.0 - 2018-07-19

AEOLUS 0.9.0 RELEASE NOTES 30/06/2013

Maintenance release.

AEOLUS 0.8.4 RELEASE NOTES 14/03/2010

AEOLUS 0.8.0 RELEASE NOTES 29/01/2008

**** Experimental release. ****

AEOLUS 0.6.6 RELEASE NOTES

The stops directory

The aeolus binary itself is a generic organ synth and does not define any instrument. In order to use Aeolus you need a directory containing definitions of stops and of an instrument. The one supplied with the current release has this structure:

     stops-0.3.0 
         |
         |___ Aeolus
         |        |          
         |        |____ definition
         |        |____ presets
         |
         |___ Aeolus1
         |        |          
         |        |____ definition
         |        |____ presets
         |
         |___ Aeolus2
         |        |          
         |        |____ definition
         |        |____ presets
         |
         |___ ***.ae0
         |___ ***.ae0 
         |___ ***.ae0
         |___ ...
         |
         |___ waves
                  |
                  |___ ***.ae1
                  |___ ***.ae1
                  |___ ***.ae1
                  |___ ...

The 'Aeolus' directory is the default instrument directory. It contains two files: a 'definition' file that specifies the layout of the organ, and 'presets' that contains registration and midi presets.

There can be more than one instrument definition directory (in fact there are two more examples in the supplied stops-0.3.0). These can be selected with a command line option (see below).

The data in 'presets' only makes sense for one particular instrument, and that's why these files are kept together with the corresponding instrument definition. For binary distributions, there is a configuration option that will make Aeolus save the presets in the users's home (see below). This will allow the user to save presets for one instrument.

The *.ae0 files contain parameters for the additive synthesis. There is one such file for each rank of pipes in the organ. These are binary files and they should not be edited. 'Power users' can use the built-in synthesis editor to modify them (see section 5).

The waves directory will be empty initially. When Aeolus starts up, it will compute wavetables, one for each pipe. This is indicated by the flashing stop buttons. The same will happen whenever the tuning or temperament is changed. These wavetables can be saved (so Aeolus will be ready for use much faster next time), but only if the stops directory is writeable for the user. This will not be the case for a binary installation as the stops dir will be system-wide (e.g. /usr/share/Aeolus/stops-0.3.0).

In order to be able to save wavetables or edited stops the stops directory must be copied to a location where it can be modified by the user, (e.g. ~/stops-0.3.0).

Run-time configuration

Aeolus takes run-time options from three sources:

Apart from empty lines and comments (lines starting with '#') either of the files should just contain the command line options
you want to use, on a single line (examples given below).

If the file in the home directory exists (even empty) then the one in /etc is not used. Options given on the command line override those given in either file.

Command line options are:

(audio interface)

(output channels)

(resources)

(general)

For example if you always use Aeolus with ALSA device hw:0, using 3 periods of 512 frames and a sample rate of 44.1 kHz, and you have copied the stops directory to your home, then your ~/.aeolusrc could look like this:

    # Aeolus default options
    -A -d hw:0 -n 2 -p 512 -r 44100 -S /home/login/stops-0.3.0

where 'login' is your login name.

3. Binary packages

This release permits packagers to install a working Aeolus without touching a users's home directory, as follows.

This will use the default instrument 'Aeolus', and save the presets in .aeolus-presets in the users's home directory.

4. A quick tour of the GUI

4.1 The main window

TBC

4.2 The instrument window

TBC

4.3 The audio window

TBC

4.4 The midi window

TBC

5. Editing the synthesis parameters

TBC

6. Midi control of stop buttons

The protocol uses one controller number. The default is #98, but you can change this in global.h. The message is accepted only on channels enabled for control in the midi matrix.

The value is interpreted as follows: