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.TH tclreadline n "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.@TCLREADLINE_PATCHLEVEL@" "Johannes Zellner"

.\" (C) 1999 by Johannes Zellner
.\" FILE: "/diska/home/joze/src/tclreadline/tclreadline.n.in"
.\" LAST MODIFICATION: "Wed Aug 25 16:32:02 1999 (joze)"
.\" (C) 1998, 1999 by Johannes Zellner, <johannes@zellner.org>
.\" $Id$
.\" ---
.\"
.\" tclreadline -- gnu readline for the tcl scripting language
.\" Copyright (C) 1999  Johannes Zellner
.\"
................................................................................
.\" .SH SOURCE FILES


.SH "COMMANDS"

If you want to use \fBtclreadline\fP as a line interface
for developing tcl scripts, you probably don't have to read
this section.





.PP
The following list will give all commands, which are currently
implemented in the shared lib (e.g. libtclreadline@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.so).
Additional commands were introduced in a startup script
\fBtclreadlineSetup.tcl\fP, which lives in the tclreadline
installation directory.
................................................................................
loop. Both readline and X events are processed. Returns the
(eventually history-expanded) input string.

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::readline write\fP \fIhistoryfile\fP
writes the history to the \fIhistoryfile\fP. This command is called
automatically from the internal routine ::tclreadline::Exit.



.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::Print\fP [\fIyes / no\fP]
turns on or off the default behavior of tclsh to print the result of
every command. This is turned on by default, so it will just behave
as the tclsh w/o tclreadline. Turning off might be useful, when reading
binary data for example. If \fB::tclreadline::Print\fP is called w/o
................................................................................
.\" .SH "EXAMPLES"


.\" .SH "ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES"

.SH "VARIABLES"

\fItclreadline\fP defines the following variables in the global namespace:




.TP 5
\fBtclreadline_version\fP
holds the version string "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline_patchLevel\fP
holds the patch level string "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.@TCLREADLINE_PATCHLEVEL@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline_library\fP
holds the library string "@TCLREADLINE_LIBRARY@".







.SH "FILES"

the \fB.tclshrc\fP file in the HOME directory, which
is read on tclsh startup. Alternatively, the name of this initialization
file might be \fB.wishrc\fP ... depending on what interpreter you use.
These files should typically contain something like
.CS



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.TH tclreadline n "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.@TCLREADLINE_PATCHLEVEL@" "Johannes Zellner"

.\" (C) 1999 by Johannes Zellner
.\" FILE: "/home/joze/src/tclreadline/tclreadline.n.in"
.\" LAST MODIFICATION: "Sat Aug 28 23:38:44 1999 (joze)"
.\" (C) 1998, 1999 by Johannes Zellner, <johannes@zellner.org>
.\" $Id$
.\" ---
.\"
.\" tclreadline -- gnu readline for the tcl scripting language
.\" Copyright (C) 1999  Johannes Zellner
.\"
................................................................................
.\" .SH SOURCE FILES


.SH "COMMANDS"

If you want to use \fBtclreadline\fP as a line interface
for developing tcl scripts, you probably don't have to read
this section. In this case the only thing you should do is
to modify your .tclshrc according to the section \fBFILES\fP.

For the functionality of the GNU readline you should refer to
the readline's documentation.

.PP
The following list will give all commands, which are currently
implemented in the shared lib (e.g. libtclreadline@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.so).
Additional commands were introduced in a startup script
\fBtclreadlineSetup.tcl\fP, which lives in the tclreadline
installation directory.
................................................................................
loop. Both readline and X events are processed. Returns the
(eventually history-expanded) input string.

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::readline write\fP \fIhistoryfile\fP
writes the history to the \fIhistoryfile\fP. This command is called
automatically from the internal routine ::tclreadline::Exit.
If the variable \fBtclreadline::historyLength\fP is non-negative,
the historyfile will be truncated to hold only this number lines.

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::Print\fP [\fIyes / no\fP]
turns on or off the default behavior of tclsh to print the result of
every command. This is turned on by default, so it will just behave
as the tclsh w/o tclreadline. Turning off might be useful, when reading
binary data for example. If \fB::tclreadline::Print\fP is called w/o
................................................................................
.\" .SH "EXAMPLES"


.\" .SH "ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES"

.SH "VARIABLES"

\fItclreadline\fP defines the following variables in the
namespace \fI::tclreadline\fP:
(for backwards compatiblity the global variables tclreadline_version,
 tclreadline_patchLevel and tclreadline_library are still present).

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline::version\fP
holds the version string "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline::patchLevel\fP
holds the patch level string "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.@TCLREADLINE_PATCHLEVEL@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline::library\fP
holds the library string "@TCLREADLINE_LIBRARY@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline::historyLength\fP
Number of lines, which will be written to the historyfile.
This number is -1 by default, which means that the historyfile
will not be truncated.  See also \fBtclreadline::write\fP.

.SH "FILES"

the \fB.tclshrc\fP file in the HOME directory, which
is read on tclsh startup. Alternatively, the name of this initialization
file might be \fB.wishrc\fP ... depending on what interpreter you use.
These files should typically contain something like
.CS