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.TH tclreadline n "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@" "Johannes Zellner"

.\" (C) 1999 by Johannes Zellner
.\" FILE: "/home/joze/src/tclreadline/tclreadline.n.in"
.\" LAST MODIFICATION: "Mon Aug 23 22:31:24 1999 (joze)"
.\" (C) 1998, 1999 by Johannes Zellner, <johannes@zellner.org>
.\" $Id$
.\" ---
.\"
.\" tclreadline -- gnu readline for the tcl scripting language
.\" Copyright (C) 1999  Johannes Zellner
.\"
................................................................................
turns on or off the default behavior of tclsh to print the result of
every command. This is turned on by default, so it will just behave
as the tclsh w/o tclreadline. Turning off might be useful, when reading
binary data for example. If \fB::tclreadline::Print\fP is called w/o
arguments, it returns the current setting.

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::Loop\fP
enter the tclreadline main loop. This command is typically called from
the startup resource file (something .tclshrc, depending on the interpreter
you use, see the file `sample.tclshrc'). The main loop sets up some
completion characteristics as variable -- try something like "puts $b<TAB>" -- 
and command completion -- try "puts [in<TAB>".



\fB::tclreadline::Loop\fP will normally not return. 
If you want to write your own main loop and/or own custom completers,
it is probably a good idea to start with tclreadline::Loop
(see the file tclreadlineSetup.tcl).

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::prompt1\fP
................................................................................
.\" .SH "EXAMPLES"


.\" .SH "ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES"

.SH "VARIABLES"




The global variable \fBtclreadline_version\fP holds the version number







of the tclreadline package.


.SH "FILES"

the \fB.tclshrc\fP file in the HOME directory, which
is read on tclsh startup. Alternatively, the name of this initialization
file might be \fB.wishrc\fP ... depending on what interpreter you use.
These files should typically contain something like
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.TH tclreadline n "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.@TCLREADLINE_PATCHLEVEL@" "Johannes Zellner"

.\" (C) 1999 by Johannes Zellner
.\" FILE: "/diska/home/joze/src/tclreadline/tclreadline.n.in"
.\" LAST MODIFICATION: "Wed Aug 25 16:32:02 1999 (joze)"
.\" (C) 1998, 1999 by Johannes Zellner, <johannes@zellner.org>
.\" $Id$
.\" ---
.\"
.\" tclreadline -- gnu readline for the tcl scripting language
.\" Copyright (C) 1999  Johannes Zellner
.\"
................................................................................
turns on or off the default behavior of tclsh to print the result of
every command. This is turned on by default, so it will just behave
as the tclsh w/o tclreadline. Turning off might be useful, when reading
binary data for example. If \fB::tclreadline::Print\fP is called w/o
arguments, it returns the current setting.

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::Loop\fP [\fIhistoryfile\fP]
enter the tclreadline main loop. This command is typically called from
the startup resource file (something .tclshrc, depending on the interpreter
you use, see the file `sample.tclshrc'). The main loop sets up some
completion characteristics as variable -- try something like "puts $b<TAB>" -- 
and command completion -- try "puts [in<TAB>".
If the optional argument \fIhistoryfile\fP is given, this file will
be used for reading and writing the command history instead of the
default \fB.tclsh-history\fP.
\fB::tclreadline::Loop\fP will normally not return. 
If you want to write your own main loop and/or own custom completers,
it is probably a good idea to start with tclreadline::Loop
(see the file tclreadlineSetup.tcl).

.TP 5
\fB::tclreadline::prompt1\fP
................................................................................
.\" .SH "EXAMPLES"


.\" .SH "ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES"

.SH "VARIABLES"

\fItclreadline\fP defines the following variables in the global namespace:

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline_version\fP
holds the version string "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline_patchLevel\fP
holds the patch level string "@TCLREADLINE_VERSION@.@TCLREADLINE_PATCHLEVEL@".

.TP 5
\fBtclreadline_library\fP
holds the library string "@TCLREADLINE_LIBRARY@".

.SH "FILES"

the \fB.tclshrc\fP file in the HOME directory, which
is read on tclsh startup. Alternatively, the name of this initialization
file might be \fB.wishrc\fP ... depending on what interpreter you use.
These files should typically contain something like