Installation

Requirements

Host Computer - 64/32-bits Linux with compilation environment - (If only the RPi architecture is required it is enough with a 32-bits Linux box) - AdaCore GNAT compiler

Target Computer (architecture X86) - An i386 PC or above (32 bits architecture) - Ethernet card for remote loading (optional) - Serial port for remote debugging (optional)

Target Computer (architecture RPi) - Raspberry Pi 1 Model B

Installation

0) Requirements

0.1) Setting the 64/32-bits Linux compilation environment

Make sure you have the environment properly set up:

$ sudo apt-get install build-essential libc6-dev-i386  

0.2) Installing native AdaCore GNAT compiler

MaRTE OS is written in Ada, then even in the case you are not going to program Ada applications, you will need the GNAT compiler to compile the MaRTE kernel. Installing it is very easy and can be done in your own user directory without affecting the rest of the system. Each MaRTE OS version has support for a set of AdaCore compiler versions. Make sure you are using the right compiler, otherwise the MaRTE OS installer will complain.

Installing an AdaCore GNAT compiler is very simple. Just go to the AdaCore website at https://libre.adacore.com/ and download the compiler. Then, you have to decompress it and execute a simple script.

For example, for the GNAT-GPL-2016 version execute:

$ cd $HOME/myapps $ tar -zxvf gnat-gpl-2016-x8664-linux-bin.tar.gz $ cd gnat-gpl-2016-x8664-linux-bin $ ./doinstall $ Choose a non-standard installation and specify where you want to have the compiler (i.e: $HOME/myapps)

Remember to put the directory where GNAT binaries are located AT THE FRONT of your PATH:

$ export PATH=$HOME/myapps/gnat/bin:$PATH

For making it permanent you can add the previous command to your shell startup script (i.e: $HOME/.bashrc or $HOME/.bash_profile)

For RPi architecture it is also required the GNAT for ARM (read the INSTALL_RPi.txt document sections "Installation.0").

1) Installing MaRTE OS

1.1) Untar and 'minstall'

MaRTE OS is very simple to install. You just have to uncompress it and run a script. Check that you have the GNAT compiler in front of your path ($ echo $PATH) and execute the following commands:

    $ cd $HOME
    $ tar -zxvf marte-version.tar.gz
    $ cd marte
    $ ./minstall

'minstall' will try to find your GNAT installation path and a make a few symbolic links.

1.2) Compile MaRTE libraries

After 'minstall' has finished its work it provides the list of available architectures (according to the GNAT/GCC installed in your system).

It is convenient to include the 'utils/' directory in your path in order to have direct access to MaRTE tools :

    $ export PATH=$PATH:$HOME/marte/utils

To make this change permanent you can add the previous command to your shell startup script (i.e: $HOME/.bashrc or $HOME/.bash_profile).

If you are installing a binary version of MaRTE OS you have already finished the installation. You can read how to switch between architectures bellow in this chapter and jump to section 2 "Check your installation with an example".

If you are installing a source distribution of MaRTE OS the final step will be to compile MaRTE OS kernel and libraries. To do it, you must set the chosen architecture (using script 'msetcurrentarch') and compile two libraries:

  • GNAT RTS modified for MaRTE (using script 'mkrtsmarteuc')
  • MaRTE library "libmarte.a" (using script 'mkmarte')

For example, if you want to compile MaRTE for "linux_lib" architecture you should execute:

    $ msetcurrentarch linux_lib
    $ mkrtsmarteuc
    $ mkmarte

You can do the same for different architectures since in the same MaRTE installation it is possible to have several architectures copiled and ready to use.

Once you have compiled all the architectures you want, it is possible to switch from one architecture to another using the script 'msetcurrentarch':

   $ msetcurrentarch architecture_name

Examples of use of 'msetcurrentarch' are shown below:

    $ msetcurrentarch linux
    $ msetcurrentarch linux_lib
    $ msetcurrentarch x86 [i386 | pi | pii]
    $ msetcurrentarch rpi

Notice the architecture "x86" requires and extra parameter (the processor):

  • i386: Intel x86 processor. PIT is used as timer and clock.
  • pi: Pentium I. PIT is used as timer and TSC as clock.
  • pii: Pentium II or above. LocalAPIC timer used as timer and TSC as clock.

Note: Sometimes you will want to have several instances of MaRTE OS installed on the same system (for example to have several versions of MaRTE OS) leading to a collision when using the directories in the $PATH variable. One possibility is to have them with different names and make a symbolic link to know which one you want to use at the moment. (The same goes for the GNAT compilers). For example, in the following tree "marte" is a the symbolic link (ln -s realmarte marte):

    |-- marte -> marte-13Jan2009/
    |-- marte-22Aug2008/
    `-- marte-13Jan2009/

2) Check your installation with an example

At this point, a working MaRTE OS environment should exist in your host. In order to check it you can compile an example from the MaRTE OS 'example/' directory.

    $ cd $HOME/marte/examples
    $ mgcc hello_world_c.c (for a C application)
    $ mgnatmake hello_world.adb (for an Ada application)
    $ mg++ hello_world_cpp.cc (for a C++ application)

The compilation and linking processes should be accomplished without any error, and the resulting application 'a.out' should have been created. You can use 'mgcc' with the same options as 'gcc'. For instance to set the output path and filename for the application you could use the `-o' option.

    $ mgcc hello_world_c.c -o mprogram

For more information about building, running, and debugging user applications please chech the next sections and the documentation in the MaRTE OS website (http://marte.unican.es)

3) Running the application.

(For RPi architecture go to INSTALL_RPi.txt section "Installation.3")

If you have chosen linux or linux_lib as the architecture you can run the program as any other linux application:

    $ ./mprogram

For the x86 architecture there are several ways of running the 'mprogram' we just built in the previous section. You can use your own PC by adding it to your GRUB menu, you can use an emulator or you can use a target PC. These possibilities are well explained in the tutorials section at the MaRTE OS website (http://marte.unican.es/).

For example, using the QEMU emulator (version 0.12.3 or above) a 'mprogram' compiled for the x86 architecture can be executed using the following command:

    $ qemu -kernel mprogram

4) Debugging the application

(For RPi architecture go to INSTALL_RPi.txt section "Installation.4")

If you have chosen linux or linux_lib as the architecture you can debug the program as any other linux application:

    $ cd $HOME/marte
    $ mgnatmake -g hello_world.adb -o mprogram

or $ mgcc -g helloworldc.c -o mprogram $ gdb mprogram

For the x86 architecture if you are using a target PC you can debug it through a Serial Port cable. Edit 'helloworld.adb' or 'helloworld_c.c', uncomment the lines labeled as "For Debugging" and recompile the program with the -g flag:

    $ mgnatmake -g hello_world.adb -o mprogram

or $ mgcc -g helloworldc.c -o mprogram

Now your program gets blocked before displaying the hello world message. Run 'gdb':

    $ gdb mprogram

The connection with the target is performed executing the following gdb command:

    (gdb) target remote /dev/ttyS0

Where '/dev/ttyS0' is the device file for the serial port 1. After this you should get a message like this:

Remote debugging using /dev/ttyS0
main () at hello_world.c:25
25        printf("\nHello, I'm a C program running on the MaRTE OS.\n\n");

For the x86 architecture if you are using the QEMU emulator as a target PC you can use its built-in debugging capabilities. (More in the tutorials section):

    $ qemu -kernel mprogram -s -S &
    $ gdb mprogram
    (gdb) target remote localhost:1234
    (gdb) break main
    (gdb) cont

What to do next?

You should read the README and the "MaRTE User's Guide" (marte_ug.html) in order to get an overview of MaRTE services and usage.

To know more about some extra utilities provided with MaRTE you should read the tutorial "MaRTE OS misc utilities" in the documentation section of the MaRTE OS web page (http://marte.unican.es/documentation.htm).

If you want to use MaRTE OS in a cross development environment (architecture X86) read the "MaRTE OS Boot process (x86 architecture)" tutorial in the documentation section of the MaRTE OS web page.

If you want to use MaRTE OS with the QEMU emulator (architecture X86) read the tutorial "Hello MaRTE OS using an emulator" tutorial in the documentation section of the MaRTE OS web page.